Visiting the float barns during 2019 Rose Parade Deco Week

by Laura Berthold Monteros

The Rose Examiner dropped in on the three float barns last Friday and Saturday to see the progress of the creations at the commercial builders and to talk to some of the folks doing the decorating. The 130th Tournament of Roses Parade happens on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, so the decorators—almost all volunteers—were busy cutting statice, powdering rice, gluing on flowers, and filling vials.

Be sure to check out the gallery below to see the progress all those volunteers were making.

Making the rounds at Phoenix Decorating Company

Ryan Young with the Farmers Insurance float.

Our trip started off with a bang at Phoenix Decorating Company in Irwindale. We had just walked in the door when a sound like an I-beam hitting the floor split the air. Those cavernous float barns echo, so it turned out it wasn’t as bad as it sounded. There had been a small explosion under the Trader Joe’s float. The folks at Phoenix reacted immediately, with crew chiefs hurrying the decorators off the scaffolding and away from the float.

“Go back to your floats, go back to your floats!” the other volunteers were ordered. Everyone complied, because after all, those floats had to be covered with flowers in less than four days.

We asked a man who had been waiting to work on the Kiwanis float if it was scary. “It certainly was,” he said. Another man suggested that the sulphur-scented smoke we noticed might well be just dust and glue, and we returned to our tour of the floats

At the Farmers Insurance float, “A Carousel of Experience,” we met Ryan Young, a Philadelphia transplant. He’s only been in Pasadena for a few months, and already he was fully into the experience of decorating a float.

“I didn’t realize the scale,” he said, comparing the TV version and the real thing. “It’s neat to see it coming together.”

Young works in procurement for Farmers, which is a good match for his role on the float. He said his job is to be a runner, getting whatever anyone working on the float needs.

At the United Sikh Mission float, “A Divine Melody Resonates in All,” we ran into creative director Minu Singh, whom we spoke with last year. The float features a giant rabab, which she said was the first Sikh instrument. It was used by Guru Nanak to spread his message of the oneness of all though his poems and songs.

“Everything in our holy book is music,” Singh said. “Every time we congregate, it’s about singing.” She spoke of an “eternal cosmic symphony.” “Every bit of creation is part of the symphony,” she said.

A few blocks north at Fiesta Parade Floats

Tejinder and Simran cut statice for the United Sikh Mission float at Phoenix Decorating Company.

We got to Fiesta Parade Floats around lunch time, and most of the volunteers were up on the floats or scaffolds so we stuck to taking pictures. We did notice that there were a couple towering humans looking down from the decks, though.

Lono, the Hawaiian god of music and peace and the deity associated with the fertile lands of the Hawaiian Islands stands at the front of “Rhythms of Paradise,” the Dole Packaged Foods float. Stella Rosa lets the genie out of the (wine) bottle with “Taste of Magic.” (Others are on the American Armenian float at Phoenix and AES’ 24 Hour Fitness float.)

“Harmony Through Union,” the first entry from the Chinese American Heritage Foundation, doesn’t have a whole human, but it does have two spectacularly huge arms, one holding a mallet and the other a golden spike to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the historic meeting of the eastern and western portions of the Transcontinental Railroad in Promontory, Utah on May 10, 1869, and to celebrate the contributions of immigrants.

Rosemont Pavilion

Denise Godfrey and Emma McGregor at the Cal Poly Universities float.

Previously used by Phoenix Decorating Company, Rosemont Pavilion now holds the AES floats for final decorating, as well as Cal Poly Universities and the FTD vehicle decorating. We were able to strike up a couple conversations at the floats. Check back after the Rose Parade for more about the four vehicles that will carry the celebrities in the parade.

At the Cal Poly float, “Far Out Frequencies,” we were given a California Grown sticker, which indicates that 85 percent of the floral material on the float was grown in California. Denise Godfrey was there with her daughter Emma McGregor. Their family business, Olive Hill Greenhouses, was founded by Godfrey’s parents in 1973. They have been supplying indoor plants to Cal Poly for about four years.

At the Chipotle Mexican Grill float, “Cultivate a Better World,” we found Russ Wimmer and Aida Bueno busily mixing spices to cover the float. And that is mostly what will cover the float. Wimmer told us that Chipotle insisted that only the 51 ingredients used at their restaurants can be used on the floats.

Red is created with a mixture of fresh chili pepper flakes and chili powder. The wood is brown rice instead of the usual paper bark, and juniper berries, oregano, lemon leaf, and corn husks are seen throughout the float. Baskets laid out around the deck like a vegetable stand will be filled with fresh produce. The only roses will be a red edging around the bottom and white spray roses tucked into a garland of red chili peppers. The Tournament of Roses granted a variance to allow a wheelchair lift at the back to remain uncovered.

For a list of all the floats with builders and designers, read “Rose Parade 2019 float entries.”

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INSIDER’S GUIDE TO THE 2019 TOURNAMENT OF ROSES

by Laura Berthold Monteros

More Than a Parade is the title of a book by Michael K. Riffey, who was Tournament of Roses president in 2004. “America’s New Year Celebration” got started with the Rose Parade in 1890, but nowadays there are many events and activities to keep folks busy between Dec. 26 and Jan. 3. The grand events on Jan. 1, 2019 are 130th Rose Parade and 105th Rose Bowl Game, of course. This guide has information and tips on the how-to of the parade, game, and other activities. Check out our 2019 Tournament of Roses main page for links to our complete calendar and articles on events, ticketing, and floats. With a little planning, your visit to Pasadena should sail along like—well, like a Rose Parade float!

GENERAL TIPS

  • Dress casually and wear comfortable shoes. There will be a lot of walking and standing.
  • The only thing predictable about Southern California weather is its unpredictability. It might be cold in the morning and evening, and hot during the day. Layers are a good idea. So is a weather app!
  • Travel light—carry only what you need for the place you’re going. For all venues, we recommend keeping money or a wallet in a front pocket and limiting valuables to cash, ID, car keys, and tissues.
  • Carry a bottle of water.
  • Accessibility—Pasadena is continually working to increase accessibility for the handicapped and those with sight or hearing difficulties. Questions can be directed to the Accessibility Issues Coordinator at (626) 744-4782 or aeverett@cityofpasadena.net.
  • Get your tickets in advance for pre-parade and post-parade events from Sharp Seating Company. They are also available at the venues, but the lines are long and some of the events sell out.
  • Grandstand tickets for the Rose Parade must be purchased in advance, but there is always room to stand for free.
  • The Pasadena Convention and Visitor Bureau hotline at (877) 793-9911 is a good resource for folks on the go.

GETTING AROUND

  • Plan your driving route and an alternate ahead of time. Traffic is heavier during the days before and after the Rose Parade and Rose Bowl Game.
  • Many streets are closed to all vehicles except those of residents on New Year’s Day, as indicated on this map from the City of Pasadena. Freeway ramp closures should be posted by Caltrans next week, but they will likely be the same as 2018, noted in this Caltrans PDF.
  • Public transportation is available using Metro trains and buses and Pasadena Transit.
  • The train servicing Pasadena is the Gold Line; extra trains are added for the Rose Parade. From the west (North Hollywood and Glendale), the 501 Orange Line bus stops at the Del Mar Gold Line station.
  • Pasadena Transit goes to all the venues within the city limits, but schedules and stops may change in the days leading up to the Rose Parade. There are no Pasadena Transit buses on New Year’s Day.
  • Metro Bike Share is no longer available in Pasadena..

PRE-PARADE EVENTS

Decorating Places (pre-parade float viewing), Dec. 28-31 at Rosemont Pavilion in the Rose Bowl area, is a great way to see the final floral touches being applied to the huge constructions.

Sip and Savor (food and activities), Dec. 28-30 on the Jackie Robinson Field behind Rosemont Pavilion. Prices vary.

Live on Green is a free event at the Pasadena Convention Center, Dec. 29-31 starting at 10 a.m. There are activities, music, food, exhibits, and demonstrations for all ages. Parking is available in Convention Center garage (expensive) or at meters on the streets (1-2 hours only). Pasadena Transit Route 10 stops a block to the north.

Equestfest on Dec. 29 at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center shows off the skills of the equestrian groups in the Rose Parade. Food and concessions are available on site, and visitors can tour the barns. The 501 Mero Bus is the only public transportation, and the closest stop is about a mile-and-a-half away. Parking in unpaved lots is sold at the venue.

Bandfest has three field shows on Dec. 29 & 30  featuring the bands that march in the Rose Parade at Pasadena City College. Visitors will be in full sun all day, so sunblock and water are musts. Parking is free, and food and concessions are available. Pasadena Transit Routes 10 & 60 will get  you there.

Rose Bowl Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, Dec. 31 at 12:30 p.m. in Rose Bowl Lot K, is an opportunity to enjoy a luncheon with the inductees into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame Class of 2018. Parking is free in the lots surrounding the stadium, or take Pasadena Transit Route 51 or 52.

Rose Bowl Bash, Dec. 30 & 31 in Bloc Plaza at Hope & 7th Street, Downtown Los Angeles. this family event is free and is located near the 7th Street Metro Station.

Public Tailgate, Jan. 1, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Lot 1A at the Rose Bowl. The event is free. Contact the Rose Bowl Stadium at (626) 577-3100 or at www.rosebowlstadium.com for more information.

POST-PARADE EVENTS

A Showcase of Floats, Jan. 1 & 2, is the best way to see the floats up close and personal in all their grandeur. There is a lot of walking and standing and almost no shade, so even in cool weather, it can feel quite warm. White Suiters and builders are on hand to offer details about the floats and flowering, and the animation on self-built floats is often running. There are food and merchandise vendors on site and free water from the City of Pasadena. Park-N-Ride shuttles are available, but there are also several lots in the area that sell parking to benefit schools and churches. Free street parking is also available.

THE ROSE PARADE

Parade route closures

The Pasadena Police Department announced that it will continue the early Rose Parade route closure from last year. Closures are indicated on this map from the City of Pasadena. Freeway ramp closures should be posted by Caltrans next week, but they will likely be the same as 2019, noted in this Caltrans PDF.

Getting there

Driving: Bring a map or use GPS, as some streets and freeway ramps will be closed. Try to stay a half mile or more above or below the parade route for as long as possible, and allow at least three times as much time travel as you normally would.

Parking: In addition to commercial parking vendors, there are plenty of spaces available from churches, businesses, and schools in the vicinity. Check out Craigslist Los Angeles for merchants selling reserved parking. Park on the same side of the route that you are coming from to avoid having to cross Colorado Blvd. in a car. Street parking is available for free if you don’t mind walking three-quarters or a mile or more, and the no-overnight-parking rule in Pasadena is suspended within a certain distance of the parade.

Public transportation: Metro Gold Line has several stops within walking distance of the parade. West to east, these stations are Del Mar, Memorial Park, Lake Avenue, and Allen Avenue. Metro runs additional trains and more frequent Gold Line service from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. on parade day.

When to get there and where to sit

  • The parade starts on Orange Grove just south of Colorado Blvd. promptly at 8 a.m. and takes about two hours to get to the end of the route on Sierra Madre Blvd. Grandstands provide the assurance of a reserved seat and a place to sit; the vendor will let purchasers know when to arrive. Parade-goers who don’t mind standing can usually find a good spot up to an hour or two before the parade arrives, especially further east on the route. Viewing is best from the south, or “camera side” of Colorado Blvd.
  • Be sure to look up just before the parade starts, to catch the B2 bomber flying over from west to east!

Travel light

Take a tote bag to stash snacks, beverages and the layers you shed. Keep money or your wallet in a front pocket and limit valuables to cash, ID, car keys, and tissues. Food, beverages and souvenirs are sold along the parade route.

Camping out

Who: Adults and children with adults. No one under the age of 18 may stay overnight on the street without a parent or guardian. Curfew is in effect from 10 p.m. to  5 a.m.

What to bring: Bring enough layers to keep warm, including a sleeping bag. Chairs and small professionally made barbeques (such as hibachis) that stand at least one foot off the ground are allowed. Tents, couches, ladders, scaffolding, boxes, alcoholic beverages, and bonfires or open fires are prohibited.

When & Where: Chairs and bags can be placed beginning at noon the day before the parade. No one is allowed to stand, sit, or have gear in the street until 11 p.m.

Don’t rope off any public area, including the sidewalk, curb, gutter, and street; sell items without a permit; throw anything onto the parade route at any time, including tortillas, marshmallows, and spray string; walk in the street; or block the sidewalk so people cannot easily pass.

Know the players

An official Rose Parade program is well worth the price. They are available on the street, online from Sharp Seating, in stores around town, or at the Pasadena Museum of History.

When the parade is over

Getting home from the Rose Parade can take even longer than getting there. Some people grab a bite to eat at a local restaurant or pack a lunch to eat in their cars while they wait for the traffic to disperse or the lines at the train station to go down. Please remember to put trash in the receptacles provided.

Audio and Braille

A free audio tour of the floats can be downloaded to a cell phone by calling (626) 321-4768.  A special version of the Rose Parade program guide is available in Braille by calling (800) BRAILLE.

ROSE BOWL GAME

Schedule

  • Rose Bowl Stadium parking lots open at 4 a.m.
  • Public Tailgate begins at 8 a.m.
  • Gates open at 10 a.m.
  • Pre-game activities in the stadium begin at 1:00 p.m.
  • Game starts at 1:30 p.m.

Getting there

  • No matter how you go, allow plenty of time. Traffic will be extremely heavy.
  • Stadium and parking map is on the Rose Bowl Stadium site.
  • Parking is $40 per car at the Rose Bowl. There is no reserved parking and no in-and-out privileges, but tickets for parking and tailgating can be purchased in advance at https://www.parkjockey.com/rose-bowl
  • Parking is $45 per car at the Parsons lot in Old Pasadena at Union Street and De Lacey Avenue, with entrances off of Walnut Street and Holly Street in Pasadena. Reserved parking can be purchased in advance through LAZ Parking. Overnight parking and bus and RV parking are also available. Call LAZ Parking at (626) 578-1705 for further details.
  • By rail, take the Gold Line to the Memorial Park Station.
  • By taxi, ride-share, or to be dropped off, the designated drop-off, pick-up and taxi zone is on Holly Street between Fair Oaks Avenue and Arroyo Parkway.  There are no provisions for drop-offs and pick-ups at the stadium.
    A free shuttle at the Parsons lot on Fair Oaks and Holly takes visitors to the stadium whether they arrive by foot, rail, taxi, or car. The shuttle runs continuously from 10:00 a.m. until approximately two hours after the end of the game.

Fan guidelines

  • Please read the Game Safety Guidelines carefully. They are very specific and designed to ensure everyone has a good time. Briefly, they are
  • Everyone and every bag will be searched.
  • Only approved bags will be allowed; details and illustrations are on the site.
  • Strollers are allowed but will have to be checked with an usher or at the checked items tent.
  • The Rose Bowl abides by the Southern California Fan Code of Conduct.
  • If  you see something, say something.

130th TOURNAMENT OF ROSES CALENDAR

Compiled by LB Monteros

DECO WEEK. DEC. 28-31

Most events take place during Deco Week, the last furious flurry of activity that gets the Rose Parade and Rose Bowl Game ready for the big day. Information on these events is this article.

FRIDAY, DEC. 28, 2018

Decorating Places (pre-parade float viewing), 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Rosemont Pavilion, 700 Seco St., Pasadena. See the floats in the final stages of preparation for the Rose Parade. Tickets can be purchased online at Sharp Seating Company for $15. People interested in working on the floats should contact the various float builders.

Sip and Savor (food and activities), 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Jackie Robinson Field behind Rosemont Pavilion. Prices vary.

SATURDAY, DEC. 29, 2018

Decorating Places (pre-parade float viewing), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Rosemont Pavilion, 700 Seco St., Pasadena. Live on Green, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Pasadena Convention Center, 300 E. Green St., Pasadena. Free activities, exhibits, and shows for all ages.

Equestfest, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with the show beginning at high noon at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center. Tickets sold on site or online at Sharp Seating for $15 per person (age 5 and under free).

Sip and Savor (food and activities), 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Jackie Robinson Field behind Rosemont Pavilion. Prices vary.

Bandfest, 1:30 p.m. at Pasadena City College. Parking is free; tickets on site or online at Sharp Seating for $15 per person (age 5 and under free).

SUNDAY, DEC. 30, 2018

Bandfest, 9:30 a.m. at Pasadena City College.

Live on Green, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Pasadena Convention Center, 300 E. Green St., Pasadena.

Rose Bowl Bash, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Bloc Plaza at Hope & 7th Street, Downtown Los Angeles. Free family event.

Decorating Places (pre-parade float viewing), 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Rosemont Pavilion, 700 Seco St., Pasadena and Rose Float Plaza South, 5400 Irwindale Ave., Irwindale.

Sip and Savor (food and activities), 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Jackie Robinson Field behind Rosemont Pavilion. Prices vary.

Bandfest, 2 p.m. at Pasadena City College.

MONDAY, DEC. 31, 2018

Live on Green, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Pasadena Convention Center, 300 E. Green St., Pasadena.

Rose Bowl Bash, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Bloc Plaza at Hope & 7th Street, Downtown Los Angeles. Free family event.

Decorating Places (pre-parade float viewing), 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Rosemont Pavilion, 700 Seco St., Pasadena.

Rose Bowl Game Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. in Rose Bowl Stadium Lot K. Tickets are available from Sharp Seating for $40 and include lunch.

TUESDAY, JAN. 1, 2019

130th Tournament of Roses Parade, promptly at 8 a.m., Colorado Blvd. between Orange Grove and Sierra Madre. Tickets can be purchased from Sharp Seating. Television coverage is on KTLA (live broadcast has no commercials), ABC, Hallmark Channel, NBC, RFD-TV, Univision, and internationally.

Public Tailgate, 8 a.m. t0 1 p.m. on Jan. 1 in Lot 1A at the Rose Bowl. The event is free. Contact the Rose Bowl Stadium at (626) 577-3100 or at www.rosebowlstadium.com for more information.

Showcase of Floats, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Sierra Madre and Washington boulevards by Victory Park. Tickets on site or from Sharp Seating, $15 per person (age 5 and under free) including Park-N-Ride fare. Street parking is free or paid in local lots. Park-N-Ride shuttles are available at Pasadena City College, 1570 E. Colorado Blvd.

105th Rose Bowl Game presented by Northwestern Mutual, 1 p.m. at the Rose Bowl. Television coverage is exclusively on ESPN.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 2, 2019

Showcase of Floats, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sierra Madre and Washington boulevards by Victory Park. Gates open for seniors and disabled visitors at 7 a.m. Tickets on site or from Sharp Seating, $15 per person (age 5 and under free) including Park-N-Ride fare. Street parking is free or paid in local lots. Park-N-Ride shuttles are available at Pasadena City College, 1570 E. Colorado Blvd.

Easterseals celebrates 100 years at Fiesta Parade Floats

Actor Nic Novicki led a cheer—actually, several of them—to celebrate Easterseals 100th anniversary and the Rose Parade float at Fiesta Parade Floats.

 

by Laura Berthold Monteros

Easterseals has aided people with disabilities for a full century and is the largest disabilities service provider in the United States. To celebrate and honor this anniversary, the organzation is sending its first-ever entry, a giant flowered birthday cake down the Rose Parade route in Pasadena, Calif. on Jan. 1, 2019,. Last Saturday, Easterseals Southern California (ESSC) threw a party at Fiesta Parade Floats and invited Tournament of Roses Royalty to attend. Photos are below.

Nancy Weintraub, chief development officer for ESSC, said, “If there was ever a time to do one, this is now.” The 100th is a big party, and “it deserves a parade.”

Board member Mary Platt told us “For years [we talked about] how to get our name out among a broader group of people.” The float was a dream of hers and others. “All of a sudden, this became a reality.”

The “all of a sudden” took 18 months to two years to get through the process of committee work, coordinating with the headquarters in Chicago, and going through design and building. The festive float, “Celebrating Easterseals: 100 Years of Disability Services,” was designed by Charles Meier with  a 20-foot high cake, party horns, and presents.

Easterseals serves 1.5 million people with disabilities across the country every year. ESSC is the largest autism service in California, with 8,500 families. One of the goals of Easterseals is to build a more inclusive future for the 61 million Americans with diverse disabilities. There are services for adults, children, veterans, seniors, and caregivers. Services include day services, therapy, peer-to-peer groups which help with social interaction, camp, and assistance in finding housing and employment.

There were a couple celebrities making the rounds at the party: actress Jamie Brewer, who has been a recurring actress in 20 episodes of American Horror Story, and Nic Novicki, who has 45 acting credits on IMDB and a couple dozen credits in writing, producing, and directing. He had a recurring role on Boardwalk Empire, and as Tyrion Lannister in the spoof School of Thrones. Both were irrepresible in their excitement over the Easterseals float and the work the nonprofit does.

Novicki is an ESSC board member and Founder/Director Easterseals Disability Film Challenge. The short videos have people with disabilities on or behind the camera, and can be serious or funny. Some can be viewed at the link above, along with information on how to enter the sixth challenge in 2019.

Brewer has worked in theater since she went to a summer program in 8th grade, for which she got college credit. She learned stagecraft, acting, and valuable skills for her career. In addition to American Horror Story, a new movie, Turnover, is in post production.

“An older man takes a new direction in life,” she explained. “He hires individuals who have different backgrounds, different abilities. Two special communities are represented: the Down Syndrome community and the deaf community.”

We asked if she sees herself as a role model and groundbreaker. She replied enthusiastically, “I am! I do break barriers! I’m the first woman with Down Syndrome to walk in a New York Fashion Week.”

When it was time to cut the real cake sitting in front of the float, President & CEO Mark Whitley underscored the “effort of inclusion” Easterseals promotes. “What better way to celebrate 100 years, than a float in the Rose Parade.”

Mary  Platt stood with her son Michael, who is autistic, as she spoke. “The question is always, ‘What do you do?’” She said that the float will show some 80 million viewers all over the world what Easterseals does.

One of the most affecting speakers was Howard McBroom, Advocate for Easterseals. He worked himself into a job after some time of speaking with legislators and politicians as a volunteer. He was so effective in Sacramento, that Easterseals gave him a full-time job.

“Only one in five people with disabilities have affordable housing. The other four do not,” he stated. He says this is a “national disgrace.” When he meets with legislators who express sympathy, he tells them, “Compassion does not pay the bills.”

The young women on the Royal Court also spoke. Princess Helen Rossi, who has juvenile arthritis, said, “This event is special to me, because (for my Girl Scout Gold Award), I wrote a storybook for kids with disabilities.”

Queen Louise directly addressed the need for diversity. “I learned about Easterseals’ effort to destigmatize disability….Years ago, the Court was all white women,” she said, adding that the Tournament of Roses will continue to diversify.

“Celebrating Easterseals: 100 Years of Disability Services” will have 12 riders, spinning pinwheels, 3,000 hot pink roses, a coconut flake-covered cake, and lots and lots of marigolds. The flower is associated with Easterseals, and will be represented with fresh petals and stylized sculptures. McBroom will ride the float, with Easterseals Program Director Bryan Nguyen, who is a peer-to-peer counselor.

Kim Cohn, Vice President Marketing Communications for ESSC, explained how the riders were chosen. Each one of the 71 Easterseals affiliates were given the opportunity to nominate a rider, and 20 or 30 did.

“The committee looked for great, inspiring Easterseals stories, and those were chosen to ride the float,” she said.

Nine of the riders are Easterseals clients and three are accompanying riders. They are Kaison Shipp-Collier, 12, Easterseals Nevada (autism); Sophia Stafford, 17, Easterseals Southeastern Pennsylvania (Williams Syndrome), accompanied by sister Sabrina Stafford, Easterseals music therapist; Reagan Crabtree, 20, Easterseals Iowa (apraxia, autism); Blake Scribner, 21, Easterseals Central Illinois (brachial plexis injury), accompanied by Katie Pena, therapist; Matthew Jameson, 21, Easterseals Massachusetts (spastic diplegic cerebral palsy); Lora Glassman, 32, Easterseals Southern California (brain condition); Ernesto Gutierrez, 43, Easterseals Southern California (injury from an IED attack); Howard McBroom, 60, Easterseals Southern California (autism), accompanied by Brian Nguyen, Easterseals Program Director; danny Blake, 68, Easterseals Blake Foundation (cerebral palsy)

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Rose Parade 2019 float entries, builders, designers

24 Hour Fitness 2019 Rose Parade float by AES. Courtesy Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association.

 

by Laura Berthold Monteros

The 2019 Rose Parade float listing is out, and we promised our readers that we would give a more complete breakdown of the flowered creations that will roll along Colorado Blvd. for the 130th Tournament of Roses Parade on Jan. 1, 2019. The chart below lists the sponsors, title, builder, and designer for each float. The awards presented in 2018 are also noted.

There are 40 sponsored entries and three Tournament of Roses entries. This year, Phoenix Decorating Company is building the new Royal Court float, which Fiesta Parade Floats has done for many years.

Phoenix tops the numbers with 17 floats, followed by Fiesta with 13 and AES with seven. Five of those are sponsored, which is more than usual for AES. Designers with more than one entry are Mike Abboud (4), Art Aguirre (2), Charles Meier (3), and Stanley Meyers (4) for Fiesta; Michelle Lofthouse (11), Rachel Lofthouse (2), and Dave Pittman (2) for Phoenix; John Ramirez (5) for AES.

Most of the long-time sponsors are returning for 2019, but four who entered for several consecutive years are not: Lucy Pet, Miracle-Gro, Singpoli, and most astonishing, the City of Los Angeles. Los Angeles is the longest-running entry in the Rose Parade, racking up its 120th float last year. We will see what we can find out about that one.

New sponsors are Big Bear Rose Parade Association, Blue Diamond Almonds, Carnival Cruise Lines, Chinese American Heritage Foundation, Chipotle Mexican Grill, Easterseals, Mrs. Meyer’s Clean Day, The American Legion, and Universal Pictures and Dreamworks Animation. Stella Rosa Wines had one previous entry in 2014.

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130th Rose Parade Floats

Sponsor Title Builder Designer 2018 Award
24 Hour Fitness “Tuned for Any Challenge” AES John Ramirez
AIDS Healthcare Foundation “Another Day in Paradise” Fiesta Parade Floats Art Aguirre
American Armenian Rose Float Association “Chanting Stones: Karahunj” Phoenix Decorating Company Johnny Kanounji Judges
American Honda Motor Company “Celebration of Dreams” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse
Big Bear Rose Parade Association “Play—Rest—Repeat” Fiesta Parade Floats Mike Abboud
Blue Diamond Almonds “The Best Almonds Make the Best Almondmilk” AES John Ramirez
Burbank Tournament of Roses Association “Stompin’ Good Time” Self-Built Brian Cozakos, Adam Ostegard Founder
Cal Poly Universities “Far Out Frequencies” Self-Built Student designed Past President
Carnival Cruise Line “Come Sail Away” Fiesta Parade Floats Mike Abboud
China Airlines “Rhythms of Taiwan” AES John Ramirez International
Chinese American Heritage Foundation (CAHF) “Harmony Through Union” Fiesta Parade Floats Mike Abboud
Chipotle Mexican Grill “Cultivate a BetterWorld” AES John Ramirez
City of Alhambra, CA “Home Tweet Home” Phoenix Decorating Company Dave Pittman
City of Hope “Harmony of Hope” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse Isabella Coleman
City of Torrance “The Power of Music” Fiesta Parade Floats Art Aguirre Mayor
Dole Packaged Foods “Rhythm of Paradise” Fiesta Parade Floats Stanley Meyers Grand Marshal’s
Donate Life “Rhythm of the Heart” Fiesta Parade Floats Charles Meier Theme
Downey Rose Float Association “Let’s Go to the Hop” Self-Built Jeff Shadic, Thom Neighbors Queen
Easterseals “Celebrating Easterseals” Fiesta Parade Floats Charles Meier
Farmers Insurance “A Carousel of Experience” Phoenix Decorating Company Rachel Lofthouse American
Kaiser Permanente “Music Moves Us—Inspring a Healthier World” Fiesta Parade Floats Stanley Meyers
Kiwanis International “Helping Kids Rock Their Future” Phoenix Decorating Company Dave Pittman
La Cañada Flintridge Tournament of Roses Association “Tree Frog Night” Self-Built Renee’ Hoss-Johnson Bob Hope Humor
Lions Clubs International “Rockin’ the Vest” Phoenix Decorating Company Rachel Lofthouse
Lutheran Laymen’s League “Joy to the World, the Lord is Come” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse
Mrs. Meyer’s Clean Day “Garden Fresh” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse
Northwestern Mutual “Spend Your Life Living” Fiesta Parade Floats Stanley Meyers
Odd Fellows Rebekahs Rose Float “200 Years of Harmony” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse Director
Rotary “Service Rocks” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse Princess
Shriners Hospitals for Children “Fezzy’s Garden of Hope and Healing” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse Tournament Volunteer
Sierra Madre Rose Float Association “Harmony’s Garden” Self-Built Jason Redfox Fantasy
South Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association “Three Little Birds” Self-Built Mike Mera
Stella Rosa Wines “Taste the Magic” Fiesta Parade Floats Mike Abboud
The American Legion “Still Serving America” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse
The UPS Store, Inc. “Books Keep Us on Our Toes” Fiesta Parade Floats Charles Meier Extraordinaire
Tournament of Roses 2019 Royal Court Phoenix Decorating Company Preston Bailey
Tournament of Roses Rose Bowl Game Team: University of Washington AES N/A
Tournament of Roses Rose Bowl Game Team: Ohio State University AES N/A
Trader Joe’s “Ride Captain Ride” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse Showmanship
Underground Service Alert of Southern California (DIGALERT) “Backyard Harmony” Fiesta Parade Floats Stanley Meyers Animation
United Sikh Mission “A Divine Melody Resonates in All” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse Leishman Public Spirit
Universal Pictures and Dreamworks Animation “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” AES John Ramirez
Western Asset Management Company “Yellow Submarine” Phoenix Decorating Company Michelle Lofthouse President

Queen Louise cuts the ribbon as the 2019 Royal Court opens the Visitor Hotline

Rose Queen Louise Deser Siskel cuts the ribbon as Princesses Micaela Sue McElrath, Sherry Xiaorui Ma (behind Louise), Rucha S. Kadam, Helen Susan Rossi, Ashley Symone Hackett, and Lauren Michele Baydaline look on.

by Laura Berthold Monteros

It’s always fun to watch a gaggle of teenage girls try to figure out the buttons on a phone when the Rose Parade Royal Court sits down to answer calls from folks trying to get information on the Tournament of Roses. Phones can be confusing, but these young ladies are quick learners.

Last Monday, 101st Rose Queen Louise Deser Siskel and the six Rose Princesses opened up the Pasadena Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB) annual hotline. The event took place early this time around, so there will be plenty of time for inquiries about the Rose Parade, Rose Bowl Game, and related events. The big moment, of course, was when Queen Louise cut the red ribbon with oversized shears to officially open the phones.

Be sure to check out the photos in the gallery below. More articles about the Royal Court are here.

The event opened with brief remarks by Michael Ross, CEO of CVB; Pasadena Mayor Terry Tornek; and Tournament of Roses President Gerald Freeny. Christine Susa, CVB Director of Marketing & Communications and Crystal Williams, Communications Manager made sure all ran smoothly.

We managed to speak with a few of the girls in between calls.

Princesses Rucha and Helen said “it’s so much fun” to be on the Court and meet lots of people. They said the Court has really bonded, “like sisters.”

Helen has been living with juvenile arthritis since she was a teenager. Seeing very young children as she was being treated at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles inspired her to write and illustrate a picture book to help them deal with the disease. She called it Joe’s Toes, and it was her Girl Scout Gold Award project.

“I know how hard it is…not to do things” other kids can do, she said.

We asked her how she keeps up with the rigorous schedule of a Rose Princess. “I have a really great team at Children’s Hospital. Every day I wake up so grateful and blessed to have this experience!” It’s all about having people around who understand when she is hurting, she added.

We wanted to catch up with Princess Ashley, who attends the alma mater of The Rose Examiner’s children. She confirmed that she has submitted her applications to four universities with excellent Human Biology departments—UCLA, USC, Ohio State, and University of Washington. Coincidentally, UW is sending a team to the 2019 Rose Bowl Game. Her minor will be African-American Studies.

Asked about her life at John Muir High School, she responded, “I’m barely at Muir!” With 100 events between October and January, none of the girls spends much time on campus.

“The support is awesome,” Ashley reports. “I’m staying on top of my studies as much as possible.”

She was able to participate with the Muir Pep Squad in the Turkey Tussle for the first time. (The Turkey Tussle is the annual homecoming game for both John Muir and crosstown rival Pasadena High School, and is played in the Rose Bowl.) In addition to cheering, Ashley has been doing praise dancing since she was 10 years old, which helped her break out of her shell.

“I’m extremely blessed with this opportunity,” she said, and expressed gratefulness to God and her high school administration.

Queen Louise told us she has also submitted most of her college applications. She’s applied early acceptance to University of Chicago, Johns Hopkins, Yale, and Tufts. She affirmed that her research projects are not suffering from the Royal Court schedule.

Speaking of schedules, here are the days and hours the Visitor Hotline is open.

Visitor Hotline (877) 793-9911 Hours of Operation (PST)

Monday, December 3rd – Friday, December 7th            8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Monday, December 10th – Friday, December 14th       8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Monday, December 17th – Friday, December 21st       8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Monday, December 24th – Friday, December 28th       8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Monday, December 31st                                                            8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Hours are subject to change on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day (closed) and New Year’s Eve

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