Honor a loved one with a memorial rose on a Rose Parade float

by Laura Berthold Monteros

Donate LifeRoses seem appropriate for any occasion, and never more so than in the Tournament of Roses Parade. Some float sponsors offer people an opportunity to remember a loved one by purchasing a memorial rose that is placed on their float. With the theme of the 2018 Rose Parade being “Making a Difference,” what better way to remember someone who made a difference in the lives they touched!

Each rose has a tag for the name of the honoree and a short dedication. Donate Life and Odd Fellows and Rebekahs are featured in this article, but as others come up, we will add them.

“The Gift of TimOdd Fellowse,” designed and built by Paradiso Parade Floats, is Donate Life’s entry. The float honors both organ donors and recipients. Roses can be dedicated to donors, families, recipients, and those waiting for transplants by using the online form until Dec. 20. Current donations are listed here. This will be the organization’s 15th year in the Rose Parade.

Odd Fellows and Rebekahs have sponsored floats for 66 years. The 2018 entry, “Sacrifice to Serve,” honors recipients of the Purple Heart and will feature riders who have received the medal. Prospective riders can download the 2018 Rider Application before Aug. 3. The 2018 Memorial Garden order form is not yet posted, but will be on the rose float site soon.

Tournament of Roses Foundation presents $200,000 in grants to SGV non-profits

Forty-five organizations received checks from the Tournament of Roses Foundation on May 31.

 

by Laura Berthold Monteros

On Wednesday, the Tournament of Roses Foundation presented 45 non-profit organizations out of 81 applicants with grants totaling $200,000. Thirteen of the recipients were awarded grants for the first time. The Foundation is a tax-exempt non-profit public benefit corporation which has given more than $3 million to organizations in the San Gabriel Valley that work with children and adults in the areas of sports and recreation, visual and performing arts, and volunteer motivation and leadership development.

Tournament of Roses President Lance Tibbet said, “The Foundation’s goal is to give as much as we can.” Noting that the 2018 Rose Parade theme “Making A Difference,” he said, “You may be the only opportunity [someone] gets. You may be the only difference in their lives.” Continue reading “Tournament of Roses Foundation presents $200,000 in grants to SGV non-profits”

AIDS Healthcare Foundation honors Orlando shooting victims on 2017 Rose Parade float

A white dove, symbol of world peace, soars above a field of 49 stars, one for each of those who died. The double rainbow exemplifies promise, beauty and  enlightenment with the message of eternal hope and life. Replicas of actual messages of condolences from those who lost loved ones flutter from the Memorial Tree. Stored inside the float are more than 5,000 memorial notes from around the world. Courtesy Pasadena Tournament of Roses.

 

by Laura Berthold Monteros

On June 12, 2016, 49 men and women were killed and 53 others wounded in a mass shooting at the Orlando nightclub Pulse. On Jan. 2, 2017, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) float will honor the victims on a beautiful Rose Parade float, “To Honor & Remember Orlando.” It is designed by Art Aguirre and built by Fiesta Parade Floats. We spoke about the choice of theme and what it means to the community with three of the riders, Ged Kinslea, Senior Director, Communications for AHF; Gustavo Marrero, Vice President of Impulse Group Orlando; and Corey Lyons, President of Impulse Group Orlando.

Kinslea said that with 2017 being the 30th anniversary of AHF, the original idea had been to celebrate that anniversary on their annual float. “Fiesta Parade Floats reaches out early in the year and gives us the theme,” he said, but AHF doesn’t firm up a concept until July or August. “June 12 happened. As soon as that hit, we decided that should be the focus. We delegated it to Fiesta. The direction AHF gave was to “be spectacular.” AHF and Impulse Group were presented with three designs, and both agreed on the one illustrated above.

In choosing the theme, Marrero said, “Remembering and honoring those we lost in Orlando is the primary focus. Secondary is shedding light that Orlando still needs their help.” The float is a great opportunity to shed light on families, victims, and survivors of the tragedy, he said, and to honor lost lives and look to a better future. Impulse consulted Continue reading “AIDS Healthcare Foundation honors Orlando shooting victims on 2017 Rose Parade float”

Union Bank, American Heart Assn. salute teens who save lives on 2017 Rose Parade float

by Laura Berthold Monteros

With hands-only CPR, it takes just five minutes to learn how to save a person’s life. The 14 riders on the Union Bank/American Heart Association Rose Parade float can attest to that—eight are youngsters whose training saved a life, and six are survivors of cardiac arrest. They are joined by musician Ilisa Juried, whose life was saved by CPR when she was 18.

Ilisa Juried wrote a song and will sing it on the Union Bank/American Heart Assn. float.
Ilisa Juried wrote a song and will sing it on the Union Bank/American Heart Assn. float.

“Keep the Beat Alive” will roll down the Tournament of Roses Parade route on Monday, Jan. 2, 2017 to the music Juried composed. The sponsors are dedicated to CPR training, especially of youth, and will offer free hands-only CPR training at the Showcase of Floats on Jan. 2 and 3. It also celebrates the passage of a new law in California that requires most high school students to be trained in hands-only CPR.

We spoke with some of the riders at the Phoenix Decorating Company float barn on Thursday.

Ilisa Juried collapsed while dancing with a hip-hop crew while sightseeing in New York. She was 18 at the time. Two nurses and German visitor applied CPR for 30 minutes, until paramedics arrived with a defibrillator. In the 11 years since, she has honed her music and acting skills; she has been a professional singer since she was 13.

We asked if she had learned CPR. “Of course!” she replied. She volunteers with AHA as a speaker and CPR trainer in schools and community settings. She brought music and CPR together in writing a song that will debut on the float, “Live Your Life,” and teaching a group of teens from Crenshaw and Lincoln high schools a dance incorporating CPR ge

Madi Giese at Rosemont Pavilion
Madi Giese at Rosemont Pavilion

stures.

“You can actually do a lot by learning CPR,” she said. “Teach friends, teach family…save lives.”

Madi Giese was 15 when the CPR she learned as a Junior Lifeguard saved a life two

years ago. She was working a tennis tournament, checking players in, when a girl playing tennis collapsed on the court. The tournament director asked if anyone knew CPR.

“I knew CPR. I didn’t think I’d ever have to use it,” she said. “My boss said, ‘Do it!’” Her training kicked in; it took just 12 chest compressions to get the girl breathing again. “About 50 to 75 people were around who didn’t do anything,” she told us. “I thought, ‘What if it was me?’”

She said, “The thing I was most freaked about was that I knew what to do, and if I didn’t, if I let her die…. The main thing is to do something. Don’t just stand by.” Hands-only CPR is easy to learn, she says, no matter how old or how young someone is.

Melissa Ziebell working on the Union Bank/American Heart Assn. float.
Melissa Ziebell working on the Union Bank/American Heart Assn. float.

Melissa Ziebell was just finishing up a half marathon in Paris when her legs gave out, the result of a congenital defect she didn’t know she had. Two young girls immediately began compressions and kept her heart beating until volunteers brought a defibrillator. She said that she had spent much time training alone and is fortunate that it did not happen then. She did not get the names of the girls. “I tried to look for them, but I did not find them,” she told us.

She has since learned CPR herself, and would like to get trained in defibrillation. “They did CPR on me, but in the end, needed a defibrillator.” She says she is definitely ready to use CPR if needed.

Ziebell is a physicist who tests electro-optical devices. She was in a Ph.D. program in France at the time, and now works locally. “Electro-optics can be applied to anything,” she said, such as telecommunications and medical uses.

For more about teenagers learning CPR and an artist’s concept of the float, read “California high schoolers learn CPR.”

California high schoolers learn CPR with help from Union Bank and American Heart Association

Union Bank Crenshaw High School Student-Run Branch Manager Vernell Taylor, singer/songwriter/dancer Ilisa Juried, Abraham Lincoln High School Principal Jose Torres, Union Bank Student-Run Branch Manager Wendy Estrada, and Los Angeles-Central Coast Regional President Leticia Aguilar; unveil the Union Bank and American Heart Association float dedicated to CPR training after the donation of CPR training kits to Lincoln and Crenshaw High Schools. (left to right)
Union Bank Crenshaw High School Student-Run Branch Manager Vernell Taylor, singer/songwriter/dancer Ilisa Juried, Abraham Lincoln High School Principal Jose Torres, Union Bank Student-Run Branch Manager Wendy Estrada, and Los Angeles-Central Coast Regional President Leticia Aguilar unveil the Union Bank and American Heart Association float dedicated to CPR training after the donation of CPR training kits to Lincoln and Crenshaw High Schools. (left to right)

By Laura Berthold Monteros

For the second year in a row, Union Bank and the American Heart Association Western States Affiliate are teaming up to sponsor a float with a message in the Tournament of Roses Parade. “Keep the Beat Alive,” designed by Michelle Lofthouse and built by Phoenix Decorating Company for the 2017 Rose Parade on Jan. 1, will promote teaching high school students to perform CPR. The float will highlight youth who actually saved a life by administering CPR and the person they saved, and will honor the future generations of lifesavers who will learn CPR through new California legislation. More than 200,000 students will be trained every year.

High school students learn to perform hands-only CPR with kits donated by Union Bank. Courtesy Union Bank
High school students learn to perform hands-only CPR with kits donated by Union Bank. Courtesy Union Bank

The float was unveiled last month at a ceremony at Abraham Lincoln High School in Los Angeles, and Union Bank made a donation of eight CPR in Schools training kits to Lincoln and Crenshaw High School. The event also featured a CPR training lesson for students and announced a CPR dance team, comprised of students from both schools, to appear in the Rose Parade along with the float.

In September, 2016, California passed Assembly Bill 1719 that requires hands-only CPR training Continue reading “California high schoolers learn CPR with help from Union Bank and American Heart Association”

Make a real difference for the homeless with Real Change meters

real-changePasadena drivers are used to feeding the meter to secure a parking place, but now people—pedestrians, cyclists and motorists alike—can feed a meter and help end homelessness.  The Real Change Movement puts bright orange meters decorated with yellow happy faces in public places which collect change and credit transactions to provide homes for the homeless in Pasadena. Pasadena and homeless advocates throughout the city have been encouraging people not to give money to panhandlers, but to support local non-profits that provide real assistance instead.  Real Change meters make it easy. There’s a map app on the website to find the one closest to you.

The Real Change Movement was the first initiative of its kind within Los Angeles County.  It includes a public outreach campaign that tells residents, merchants and visitors about the movement and raises awareness about homelessness. The movement is a collaborative effort involving the City of Pasadena, Flintridge Center, County of Los Angeles, United Way of Greater Los Angeles, East West Bank, IPS Group, Pasadena City College, Art Center College of Design, and Pasadena Chamber of Commerce.

Art Center students were involved with the project from the beginning.  They came up with the idea and campaign strategy and designed the logo and color scheme.  The Pasadena In Focus newsletter for July and August, 2014 reported, “The students wanted to inspire the community to think about happiness in a more socially active way and to view the act of giving as an uplifting, positive experience.”